Campus Life at Shanghai Theatre Academy

thumb_img_1955_1024thumb_img_1956_1024 Following on from my post about ICS at Shanghai Theatre Academy which primarily addressed course-content concerns, I thought I’d share more about campus life and life as a study-abroad student in Shanghai in general. Although most of these sections will be expanded on in full-length articles of their own, for now it should serve as a useful tool to run through the basics of accommodation, social life, and food…

ACCOMODATION

I live in the Shanghai Theatre Academy student dormitory, which is conveniently located on campus. The school has two campus’ and my course is based at the Huashan Road campus, which is the smaller of the two. The Chinese Opera course is based at Lianhua Road campus (which is about an hour away from Huashan Rd) so if you opt to take that selective, you will have the opportunity to have classes at both campus’. The two minutes walk to class really does soften the blow of 8.30am starts. All foreign students are based on the 17th and 18th floor. I share my room with one other girl, and we have an en-suite bathroom. A single room isn’t a thing in Chinese universities, so wave goodbye to privacy. Compared to the domestic students though, we’re lucky – they share a room with up to five others and have to use communal toilets and showers (the latter which isn’t even located in the dormitory building).

My desk area

STA is in a great location, very central and based in Jing’an, the closest metro station is Jing’an Temple. We are on the edge of the French Concession, which is a particularly beautiful part of Shanghai, and usually quite expensive to live in. The area is instantly recognizable by its streets, which are lined with trees forming beautiful arches. As a 1-year exchange student, I pay ¥440 a month for my room, which is roughly the equivalent to around £51. However, if you are accepted on to the full 2-year M.A. programme as a scholarship student, your living expenses are covered by the university (as well as your course fees, and a monthly stipend).

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Inspired by the City Garden art installation to make my room more floral

SOCIAL AND CAMPUS LIFE

Shanghai has an excellent nightlife scene. From upscale clubs, to student pubs, to dingy dive bars, it really does have it all. It also has an amazing museum and art scene which I’m currently trying to work my way through. Unfortunately, the university doesn’t really have societies or sports teams which are a huge part of uni life in Exeter/the UK. However, our campus is still vibrant. There is always something going on. When I first arrived, there was an experimental Shakespeare festival, and since then there has been a RAW festival, an international arts festival and countless other productions. There is a gym on campus that is free for everyone to use, but it is very basic so many students opt for a paid membership to gyms nearby.

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Production of MacBain (a cross between Macbeth and the story of Kurt Cobain) during the Experimental Shakespeare Festival
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Schedule for the RAW festival
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Another day, another theatre festival on campus

The course that I’m on is actually the only one in STA that is taught in English and is only made up of around 10 people (the year before us there were only six students on the course), so there’s not really a huge international students’ scene. It is great having such artistic peers, for example, we gathered a cast and crew together and entered into a 48-hour film festival back in Autumn. There are an abundance of opportunities to get involved in the arts, with many of my friends regularly participating in full-scale shows, to improvisation nights and comedy gigs.

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The participants in the 48-hour film festival from Intercultural Communication Studies

I wanted to branch out of the university bubble and did this via the app MeetUp which informs you about a range of things occurring in the city. Through this, I was able to find free yoga classes, meditation, and a creative writing group. Something that I’m also involved in is the Shanghai branch of LadyFest (a community based organization created to open up dialogue about gender equality). Although well-known for their annual arts and music festival in celebration of International Women’s Day, they also run a plethora of other events. For example, I took part in the Dating Monologues event, in which people could submit anonymous stories of their experiences of dating in Shanghai which would be read by other speakers/actors.

FOOD

Shanghai, and China for that matter, is famous for its food. It’s undeniably a heaven for foodies, with the streets filled with delicious, fresh (and cheap) food made right in front of you, which is especially amazing for coming home from a night out. However, it is slightly more tricky for vegetarians, and I don’t know how vegans cope. I will be expanding on this in another article, but let’s just say it’s a tricky terrain to navigate. We do have a kitchen in the dorms, but it’s tiny and not very well equipped. When I first arrived, I probably ate out almost every night for the first week or two. I was just so shocked by how cheap the food is. In a noodle restaurant opposite us, you can buy a large bowl of noodles with soup, veggies and tofu (think Wagamama, but better) all for less than £1.

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Veggie Noodles
Fresh steamed buns for breakfast
Fresh steamed buns for breakfast

There is a canteen on campus, for which you’ll need to buy a meal card, and a western-style cafe. It’s actually very common for students to order in food nightly as it is so cheap. 24/7 Delivery service is readily available. McDonalds even deliver straight to your door at all hours through their app. If you want to order western-style food with apps like Sherpas, then you’ll have to pay more, but if you’re happy to eat like a local then living expenses are very low. Being located in the French Concession means you’re extremely close by to amazing bakeries, cafes and restaurants.

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Sweet treats at Sunflour Café
Head to WIYF for the best craft ice-creams in the area


For more information, go to Shanghai Theatre Academy’s website.

Study Abroad in Shanghai: Intercultural Communications at STA

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So, much to my disbelief, I’ve been in Shanghai for almost three months now. I was planning to do a series on my experiences studying at Shanghai Theatre Academy sooner, but for the past month I have been left laptop-less after a liquid damage mishap (shout out to Exeter Uni’s insurance policy Aviva for granting me a replacement). When I was preparing for my year abroad, there was a shocking lack of information provided concerning details such as course content, the academic calendar, accommodation, etc which was very frustrating. This was exacerbated by the fact that I was the first student from Exeter to undertake a year abroad at STA and therefore had no-one to share their experiences with me. So, this series will aim to cover these aspects along with other things that you’ll want to take into account when deciding on taking a year abroad such as culture shock and the social life in the city. This first post is dedicated to the details of the course itself.

I am on the Intercultural Communications MA programme. It is usually a two-year programme, with the first year consisting of classes and the second year dedicated to writing the thesis. There are 12 people on my course, but it seems to be expanding yearly as it’s relatively new (last year’s intake was six students). We’re made up of eight different nationalities, but the language of instruction for the course is English. As it is the only course at STA that is taught in English, there’s not really a range of modules to choose from. I remember browsing the modules on STA’s website and thinking I’d be able to take classes in subjects such as TV-hosting and directing. Nope. They’re all taught in Chinese. So unless you’re bilingual, you’ll be restricted to the modules specific to the ICS course. As a student on a year abroad, I am only here for one year before returning to Exeter to complete my fourth year. There is one other undergraduate (who is a student on a year abroad from the University of Leeds) and the rest of the participants are graduate students. If you are also an undergraduate, don’t be intimidated by the fact that it is an MA, the classes aren’t too challenging. They are pretty relaxed, and aside from weekly reading there isn’t much of a workload.

This term my schedule has consisted of the following modules:
Chinese Language: Three compulsory (and two optional) classes a week 8:30am-11:40am. Assessment is through a mid-term exam and a final exam. I sat the mid-term exam last week and we went through it in class beforehand, and then spent about thirty minutes working on it. It was all directly from what we’d been learning, so nothing to stress about.
Modern Chinese Performing Arts in Global Perspectives: We have eight classes in total, held weekly on Thursdays 1:30pm-4:30pm. Assessment consists of three thought-pieces reflecting on readings that have been set, a group oral presentation and a final paper of around 2500 words (or creative project) with a presentation to discuss your findings.
Intercultural Theatre: Eight classes held fortnightly on Tuesdays 1:30pm-4:30pm. Assessment consists of one final paper around 2500 words in length (or a creative project) and an informal presentation/discussion about your research.
Chinese History and Culture: Eight classes held fortnightly Tuesdays 1:30pm-4:30pm. Assessment consists of a museum report, a critical commentary on one piece of reading and a final paper to be a minimum of 800 words.
Optional Chinese Opera Acting: Three classes held on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 1:30pm-3pm.

Here, we have two academic terms as opposed to the usual three that we have back in the UK. This semester started in the first week of September and will finish in the week before Christmas. Usually, semesters in China run into mid-January, but they make an exception for our course as all participants are foreign students, and many will want to spend Christmas with their families. The second semester begins in the last week of February and runs until the first week of July. We are yet to be informed of our classes next term, but last year’s students took the mandatory Chinese language classes, Cultural Creative IndustriesFilms and Contemporary Chinese Society and Politics, and had the option to take traditional Chinese Culture & Taiqiquan, Chinese Opera Acting and Chinese Culture.

The teaching style is different. Three hour classes were definitely something I needed to adjust to. We do have a 5-10 minute break halfway through, but as someone with a short attention span, it took a while to get used to concentrating for longer than an hour at a time. All of my classes are essentially in a seminar format which I prefer infinitely to lecture-style teaching. The only issue with this format is that the quality of the class discussion is dependent on how many students do the reading, and as some of the teachers are so relaxed, it’s easy to become complacent. The flexibility of the course can be a merit though, as you can mould the course to your needs. The final paper (or creative project in some classes) has very large parameters and you’re given freedom and encouragement to seek out a topic that interests you, as long as it’s somewhat related to the class.

There is also the opportunity to gain academic credits in other projects. For example, I was among a group of STA students that decided to creatively collaborate and submit a film to the 48 hour film festival which was held in Shanghai a few weeks ago. Provided we contributed equally to the project and wrote a short reflective report on the experience, we were awarded academic credit. To complete the year, you need to have a certain amount of credits. However, the study abroad team advised me that I needed to take a minimum of seven modules, and not to worry about credits. So, perhaps the film project won’t contribute to my overall mark, but it was still an exciting experience to have.

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ICS students who took part in the 48 Hour Film Festival

 

Preparing To Study Abroad: 3-6 Months Before Departure

I can’t believe that I’ve finally begun my study abroad placement, for which I’ll be at Shanghai Theatre Academy for one academic year. It doesn’t feel that long ago that I was trying to get myself organized. My university was extremely supportive, and I’m sure the staff in the humanities study abroad office were sick of me by the end of the year, but the list of things to do seemed exhaustive, especially when it came to dealing with student finance. I have to admit that if I didn’t have a dad who was so organized, I would’ve inevitably left my preparations to the last minute. The following advice is assuming that you’ve already undertaken the necessary research into the culture of the locations that you want to go to and have narrowed down your options (if you haven’t done this, then Pinterest and ThirdYearAbroad.com are your new best friends). Although this is concerning my preparations for China, many of them can be applicable to most destinations..

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Home for the next 11 months


THINGS TO THINK ABOUT 3-6 MONTHS PRE-DEPARTURE

FINANCIAL ASPECTS
Make sure you budget before you go and consider all of the different costs that you’ll incur over the course of the year. In terms of support, you should still receive your usual maintenance loans/grants/bursaries. If you’re going to Europe, Erasmus practically pays you to study abroad, although due to Brexit this probably won’t be on offer for much longer! Although it’s not highly publicized, Student Finance England does offer travel grants. They’re a bit of a mystery and have various stipulations, but if you meet the criteria, then you could be eligible to have the following reimbursed: vaccines, visas, the medical aspect of your insurance (usually 40%), up to three return flights from your university and hometown, and the transport between your campus and university.

They’ve also brought out the mysterious concept of qualifying quarters which, depending on which member of their staff you speak to, shape-shifts. To my understanding, it basically states that you have to be in attendance for at least half of the qualifying quarter that you are applying for remuneration for. You would think they would separate the year into four equal quarters, but the ‘quarters’ seem somewhat random, so make sure you double-check before you book flights etc on certain dates or you could risk not being reimbursed.  SFE should automatically assess your eligibility for a travel grant and then send you a course abroad form to complete, but don’t expect them to do that and ask them if you think it’s taking too long. You need to get this course abroad form signed by your university so don’t leave to go home at the end of term without doing this! As soon as you have informed them of your year abroad and your loans have been approved, make sure you are regularly chasing them up about the status of your grant. Or else like me, you could end up booking your flights only for them to say that they haven’t actually assessed you yet so they’re unsure of your eligibility. Reimbursements usually take a couple of weeks to process, and their status can be checked on your student portal.

ACCOMODATION
Luckily enough, I was able to stay in the student dormitory which is a few minutes away from my classes. However, I know other students at various universities in China (and elsewhere) that automatically assumed the university would take care of the accommodation only to realize last minute that it was actually up to them. Some try to find a place before they arrive, but more commonly students stay in hostels when they arrive while they look for somewhere to live. The most important thing is to know what your options are, and to have a plan for when you arrive.

VISAS
You’ll have to complete the application form, along with other documents, and drop these with off along with your passport. Make sure the expiry date of your passport is at least six months after your departure date from your study abroad placement. They usually keep your documents for around one week before returning them. Once you arrive in China you’ll then need to take this TEMPORARY visa to the embassy within 30 days to retrieve an official resident permit.
A Link to the Chinese Embassy website can be found here.
(Other useful links for different countries: USA, Japan, Canada, Australia, New Zealand)

MEDICAL ASPECTS
Get your travel insurance sorted in good time. Luckily for me, my university offers an insurance package which averages about 67p per day for China. If you’re also at Exeter, then the link for that can be found here. Remember that most travel insurance policies only provide access to emergency medical care and do not include regular check ups or prescription access. You can pay around £90 once you arrive in China for a local insurance policy that allows you to access these facilities, but it’s better to sort any medication out before you go to be on the safe side. The NHS provides up to a three month supply of prescriptions and then you can access the rest privately at various pharmacies (I found ASDA to be the cheapest).

Happy planning!